GLOBAL REACH. LOCAL IMPACT.

For over 40 years, The Perry Institute for Marine Science has been a leader in conducting research in support of ocean conservation and stewardship throughout the Caribbean. Some of the core programs have centered around the effective use of Marine Protected Areas for marine conservation and fisheries management, the health of coral reefs and associated ecosystems, and the management of key Caribbean fishery species like the queen conch, Caribbean spiny lobster, and particularly the Nassau grouper.

MARINE SPECIES

MARINE SPECIES

Many marine species,  like the iconic Nassau grouper — a commercially and ecologically important fish species, are now considered critically endangered.

Habitat degradation, impact from environmental change, unsustainable fishing all factor into the challenges facing the world’s marine species. The Perry Institute for Marine Science (PIMS) and its partners are addressing threats to important marine species.

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MARINE PROTECTED AREAS

MARINE PROTECTED AREAS

The use of Marine Protected areas such as marine parks, fishery reserves, and other areas of the sea that receive an increased level of protective management, are important management tools for a number of purposes.

The implementation of a self-sustaining network of well-managed MPAs is of critical importance to coral reef health. The Perry Institute for Marine Science (PIMS) MPA research continues to inform fisheries and ecosystem management in The Bahamas and the wider Caribbean.

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CORAL REEFS

CORAL REEFS

Over the past decades, coral reefs around the world, including The Bahamas, have been in decline. With numerous local, regional and global threats facing coral reefs, the ability of reefs to support biodiversity and ecosystem services to people has been compromised. Our Reverse The Decline of Bahamian Coral Reefs program, a comprehensive 10-year program, is aimed at improving the health of coral reefs throughout The Bahamas.

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CLIMATE CHANGE

CLIMATE CHANGE

Climate change is the most significant challenge facing us this century.

While uncertainty remains over the effects of increased sea surface temperatures and ocean acidification on marine ecosystems, there is a general agreement that a sustained program of research is required along with long-term monitoring to guide decision-making.

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